Saturday, January 14, 2012

Visa Rules for Indonesia

Indonesia Visa Rules - There are several types of Indonesia visas such as Tourist Visa, Business Visa, Multiple-entry Visa (for business trips only) and Transit Visa. All travelers to Indonesia must possess passports, valid for at least six months after arrival, and proof of onward passage out of the country.

Visa Guidelines
Visas are not required for tourists who are nationals of Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, The Philippines, Hong Kong Special Administration Region (SAR), Macao Special Administration Region (SAR), Chile, Morocco, Peru, and Vietnam.

Countries and districts eligible for a visa on arrival are: United States of America, Australia, South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, United Arab Emirates, Finland, Hungary, United Kingdom, Italy, Japan, Germany, Canada, South Korea, Norway, France, Poland, Switzerland, New Zealand, and Taiwan.

Indonesia Visa Rules These visas can be obtained from the following airports on arrival:
Polonia (Medan), Sultan Syarif Kasim II (Pekan Baru), Tabing (Padang), Soekarno - Hatta (Jakarta), Juanda (Surabaya), Ngurah Rai (Bali), Samratulangi (Manado).

The following seaports also offer visa on arrival:

Sekupang, Batu Ampar, Nongsa and Marina Teluk Senimba (Batam), Bandar Bintan Telani Lagoi and Sri Udara Lobam (Tanjung Uban), Belawan (Belawan), Sibolga (Sibolga), Yos Sudarso (Dumai), Teluk Bayur (Padang), Tanjung Priok (Jakarta), Padang Bai (Bali), Jayapura(Jayapura).

*NOTE: The information supplied here is meant as a guide only and is subject to change without warning. Therefore all travelers should check the visa and immigration details with the local Indonesian Embassy or Consulate.

Visa Regulations Effective February 1, 2004, Indonesia has introduced wide ranging changes in the national visa-free and visa on arrival system. We've tried to summarize those changes here for your convenience.

Visa Free on Arrival
In the past the nationals of 48 nations were given a 60-day stay (visa free) upon arrival at an Indonesian international gateway.

Under the new rules effective February 1, 2004:

• Only 11 countries and territories are eligible for a "Visa Free" facility, they are: Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, Philippines, Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Chile, Morocco, Peru and Vietnam.

• Nationals of the aforementioned countries and territories will be issued with a 30-day stay permit without charge upon presentation of a valid passport with 6 months remaining validity.

• The Visa Free Facility is not extendable or convertible into another type of visa.

Visa on Arrival (updated February 2010)
Effective Jan 26, 2010, visitors holding valid passports from certain countries can now only obtain a 30-days visa on arrival (VOA). The previous 7-day visa at US$10 has been abolished, hence this 30-days US$25 visa (renewable for an additional 30 days, cost for this extension has not been revealed yet) being the only visa that can be issued to eligible tourists. This VOA can be obtained at any of the 15 airports and 21 seaports designated as "international gateways" by the Indonesian Immigration department.
Nationals of the following countries are eligible to purchase a VOA:
Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Laos, Latvia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Panama, People's Republic of China, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Switzerland, Sweden, Taiwan, The Netherlands, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States of America.

• The citizens of the aforementioned countries must hold a passport with at least 6 months remaining validity at the time of arrival, present a completed embarkation/disembarkation card provided by the airlines, be able to demonstrate they have sufficient means to live during their stay in Indonesia, not be listed on any official blacklist of individuals prohibited from entering the country, and pay the stipulated fee to obtain a visa.

• The Visa on Arrival cannot be converted into another class of visa.

• Immigration authorities promise the visa purchasing system will take no more than 3-5 minutes per applicant. Payment counters have been set up to process payments.

• Once payment is completed the tourist will proceed to an immigration counter for final inspection of documents and visa issuance.

Visa on Arrival at Limited Gateways
The visa on arrival facility will only be available at the following international gateways:

Airports: Medan, Pekanbaru, Padang, Soekarno-Hatta (Jakarta), Halim Perdana Kusuma (Jakarta), Surabaya, Bali, Manado, Yogyakarta, Solo, Mataram (Lombok), Balikpapan, Makassar, Kupang.

Seaports: Batam, Tanjung Uban (Bintan), Belawan (Medan), Sibolga (Sumatra), Dumai, Teluk Bayar (Padang, Sumatra), Padang Bai (Bali), Jayapura (Papua), Padang (Sumatra), Bitung (North Sulawesi), Tanjung Balaikarimun, Tanjung Mas (Semarang), Kupang, Pare Pare (South Sulawesi), Makassar (South Sulawesi).

Applying for Visas Before Arrival
Citizens of countries not included on a visa-free or visa-on-arrival lists must apply for a visa overseas before arriving in Indonesia. Citizens of any country wishing to stay more than 30 days must also apply for an appropriate visa at their nearest Indonesian Embassy or Consulate before traveling to Indonesia.
It seems that a 60 day visa can be issued on request in most Asian countries for all nationalities within 2 days. You may check with your local Indonesian Embassy as well, where you will probably need to give a viable reason why you need a 60 day visa vs a 30 day visa.

Special Facilities

A certain number of special facilities are being introduced in connection with the new visa policy, including:

• Tour Agents are able to arrange express handling for groups at no additional charge by presenting the completed immigration cards, passports and applicable visa fee.

• Passengers who overstay their visa period for a short period of time can be processed immediately at the airport by paying US$ 20 for every day they "overstayed" their 30 day visa.

• Airlines that experience technical difficulties or delayed flights can apply for their passengers to be exempted from paying any "overstay" penalties.

Source: Bali Discovery

TIP: Make copies of your passport and keep them separate. Losing your passport in Indonesia will cause you quite a few inconveniences since you'll have to make at least one trip to your embassy in Jakarta. We advise to make copies of travelers cheques, health insurances, drivers licenses, credit cards and bills of photo and video equipment as well. In case of loss this can help you at the police station and later on to get your lost property replaced.

For Retirees:
Retirement in Indonesia The Immigration Department has issued the long-awaited revisions to regulations that allow the granting of temporary stay permits for those over 55 years of age. This facility to provide renewable stay permits of one year's duration was originally announced in 1998 (Keputusan Menteri Kehakiman No. M.04-IZ.01.02 tahun 1998). In the first few years after the regulations were issued few retirees were actually able to actually get the visa due to the strict requirements. Revisions to the regulations in April 2002 (decree by the General Director of Immigration in law No. F. 492-UM.01.10, April 18, 2002) brought the requirements within closer reach of the financial capabilities of most retirees.
Source: Living in Indonesia - Retirement. See there for more information.

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